The £1,000 cost of summer childcare: How school holidays can hit parents for a fifth of average take-home pay

  • Childcare has soared through £100-per-week barrier for the first time
  • More than half of parents will spend £1,000 per child on entertainment this summer, a study reveals
  • 40 per cent will rely on grandparents or other family to help with care

By
Rob Cooper

10:01 GMT, 28 July 2013


|

10:01 GMT, 28 July 2013

Childcare and days out will cost parents more than £1,000 during the summer holidays as prices soar, figures have revealed.

Parents are now being forced to spend more than a fifth of their pre-tax take home pay on looking after their youngsters during the school break, if grandparents cannot help out.

Once the cost of days out, treats and meals out is taken into account the total price of the holidays tops £1,000 per child for more than half of families, a survey has revealed.

Summer sun: The cost of childcare and keeping children entertained during the holidays has hit £1,000, a study has found. here youngsters queue for ice creams in Hyde Park, London, during the recent heatwave

Summer sun: The cost of childcare and keeping children entertained during the holidays has hit £1,000, a study has found. here youngsters queue for ice creams in Hyde Park, London, during the recent heatwave

The average charge for holiday childcare has burst through
the £100 per week barrier for the first time, an increase of around ten
per cent on last year.

Privately-run schemes cost £109.23 on average but are up to £20 more in some areas.

That represents more than 20 per cent of the average pre-tax take home pay of around £500 per week across Britain.

The inflation-busting price rises will put pressure on working parents who struggle to afford holiday cover.

The Family and Childcare Trust, which conducted the research, said more children would be left on their own at home over the summer break as a result. It called for schools in rural areas – where schemes are scarce – to remain open during holidays and for tax breaks to help mothers stay at home.

A separate study by Nationwide building society found that more than half of parents will spend an extra £1,000 per child over the summer.

Soaring childcare costs: This table shows the average price of state-run and private childcare by region in the UK

Soaring childcare costs: This table shows the average price of state-run and private childcare by region in the UK

To save money, 40 per cent of parents will rely on grandparents or other family to help out with childcare, while 22 per cent will turn to friends for help.

However, 61 per cent said they will be forced to use their savings to help cover the cost of keeping their children entertained.

The Family an Childcare Trust chief executive Anand Shukla said: ‘With holiday childcare costs rising faster than wages and with the average weekly rate in Britain now breaking the £100-a-week threshold, we are likely to see more parents forced to take unpaid leave, or unable to afford to enter the labour market, and more children left without adult supervision during the summer break.

‘We need to ensure that recent proposals to allow schools to determine their own term times do not add to the problem.’

Richard Marriott, a spokesman for Nationwide, said: ‘It’s inevitable that when the kids are not at school, the cost of normal family life rockets.

Summer day out: People take advantage of a beach area on London's Southbank during the recent scorching weather

Summer day out: People take advantage of a beach area on London’s Southbank during the recent scorching weather

‘Whether it’s the price of childcare, days out, having friends over, entertainment or food, most parents will feel some impact on their pockets.’

Local authorities have a legal duty to provide sufficient childcare for working parents. But the study found only a third in England and one in six in Wales would achieve this.

One in five parents with children under 15 will use formal holiday clubs or play schemes this summer.

But the average bill is now just over £100 at state-funded schemes following an 11 per cent rise since last year.

The nine per cent increase among those run independently means care for two children over four weeks would leave working parents with a bill of £873.84.

The highest average cost was in the East of England, where the rate is £129.78 per child each week.

Campaign group Mothers at Home Matter demanded ministers act quickly to introduce a transferable tax allowance for married couples.

The comments below have not been moderated.

Just like to say well done, Aletheia from Gloucester. So very True!

DavemcDPrestwick
,

Prestwick, United Kingdom,
29/7/2013 03:04

During my childhood money was not an issue as you could spend holidays with cousins and friends in other towns and they could do the same. We have lost links with family and friends as it is too expensive to visit each other and is cheaper to contact them by mobile call. Money saving has become more important than maintaining traditional relationships with family and friends. The same parents complain about child care being expensive are the same ones who have their parents in an Old Age Home because they too are expensive to maintain. Our closest relative and friend is the extra pound we have in our savings accounts in the bank.

bigben
,

london,
29/7/2013 01:39

Schools are not child-minders, but unfortunately parents use them as such.

Paula 1001
,

Liverpool, United Kingdom,
29/7/2013 00:33

Sorry but when I was a child I made my own entertainment in the summer holidays – apart from the week the family went on holiday, usually to some seaside town or other in the North of England. Yes I did get a bit bored on occasions, but that was par for the course and I never expected to be ‘entertained’ or taken out. Why should today’s children be any different? And yes both my parents worked!

Stuart
,

Halifax_West Yorkshire,
29/7/2013 00:33

In Spain kids broke up on 25th June and go back on 9th September. I don´t work in the summer as I have the same hols as the kids but unfortunaty don´t get payed as my contract runs from 15th Sept- 30th June so I have to save up for the months I don´t work. If I had to work like most people in the summer I would have to pay someone to look after my son which would probably set me back about 10 euros an hour -80 a day- 400 a week so at the end of the summer holidays I would probably be in the red. For me it works out cheaper not working in the summer and enjoying time with my son. A summer camp for a month is about 1.000 a month which would work out cheaper so that´s what some people who have the money do. Others just rely on grandparents and relatives who can look after the kids. Summer hols are expensive. Most parents choose to take a months holiday all in one go in either July or August. In Spain we don´t have half term so there are no more hols until Xmas apart from the odd fiesta.

Tracey33
,

Madrid, Spain,
28/7/2013 23:57

Maybe researchers should be sent to some of the many countries where the summer break is considerably longer than in the UK, to find out how “child care” is organised and financed. Rather a shame that many children no longer seem to have the opportunity to develop their own ways of spending their time….many could end up leading rather dull and disatisfying lives.

teresa8
,

Abingdon, United Kingdom,
28/7/2013 23:52

Here’s a revolutionary idea …………… how about parents look after their own kids instead of paying for “childcare”?
– M M , UK, United Kingdom, 28/7/2013 21:21
……..because we have to work.

Lisa
,

Bolton, United Kingdom,
28/7/2013 23:41

If people choose to have children what do they expect? Holidays in Ireland are so much long than 6 weeks?

maggie
,

solihull, United Kingdom,
28/7/2013 22:42

Chilcare does not rise steeply in the holidays. Surely theses parents pay all year, unless they only have part-time jobs? – LulaBelle, London ======================= The children are in school the rest of the year whilst their parents are at work. These costs are for full-time care during the holidays (ie the time when the children are normally in school). So, actually, childcare DOES rise steeply during the holidays.

Carrie
,

BINGLEY,
28/7/2013 22:37

Young people today want to have everything without any of the disadvantages. You have kids and it costs money. Just what do you expect? People managed years ago on a lot less so stop moaning, give up your expensive Sky tv package and £30 month mobile phones along with a few meals out and a lot less wasting money on alcohol and suddenly you will be able to afford all this.

Aletheia
,

Gloucester, United Kingdom,
28/7/2013 22:19

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Source Article from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2380310/The-1-000-cost-summer-childcare-How-school-holidays-hit-parents-fifth-average-home-pay.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490
The £1,000 cost of summer childcare: How school holidays can hit parents for a fifth of average take-home pay
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2380310/The-1-000-cost-summer-childcare-How-school-holidays-hit-parents-fifth-average-home-pay.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490
http://news.search.yahoo.com/news/rss?p=childcare
childcare – Yahoo! News Search Results
childcare – Yahoo! News Search Results



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